Main Menu

Courses

International Year 1 and 2 Courses

EAP084: English for Academic Purposes Intermediate

Course description not available.
Course Credits: 0.0

EAP085: English for Academic Purposes Advanced

Course description not available.
Course Credits: 0.0

EAP086: Research Skills and Strategies

Course description not available.
Course Credits: 0.0

LIST083: Listening Foundations

Course description not available.
Course Credits: 0.0

ORNT: Orientation

Course description not available.
Course Credits: 0.0

READ083: Reading Foundations

Course description not available.
Course Credits: 0.0

SPEA083: Speaking Foundations

Course description not available.
Course Credits: 0.0

WRIT083: Writing Foundations

Course description not available.
Course Credits: 0.0

CDNS101: Canadian Studies

Explores the meanings of Canadian experience and citizenship, and how Canadian identities are constructed and mediated regionally, nationally and internationally. Explores these questions through topics such as regionalism, peacekeeping, sovereignty, multiculturalism, colonialism, indignity, culture industries, and business and labour relations. Examines representations of Canada in art, film, dance, comedy and drama.
Course Credits: 3.0

CESL100: Civic Engagement and Service Learning

Engages students in community service learning in the Greater Victoria area. Based on Community Service Learning Plans (CSLP), students will make voluntary contributions to a local organization of their choice and research, report and reflect upon the organization's mission, mandate, structure, intersections with civil society and overall impact on society.
Course Credits: 3.0

HUMN101: Global Studies

Investigates "thinking globally", a commonly used term in matters of global and local development, encompassing the contemporary knowledge base of informed citizens of the world. Focuses on a thematically organized enquiry into socio-political, cultural, economic, and geographic world relationships. Engages students in a variety of topics such as gender and development, poverty alleviation, natural resource issues, food production, global supply chains, and international markets.
Course Credits: 3.0

HUMN103: Foundations of Global Citizenship

Considers the many facets and understandings of citizenship – local and global - through critical, inquiry-based investigations of: ethics; identifying and interpreting bias; identity, culture and positionality; intercultural communication; nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and internationalism; Indigenous knowledge and perspectives; colonialism, postcolonialism, and international development; international structures, institutions, and initiatives; human security and well-being; and the role of civil society, active citizenship and community service learning. Introduces students to the core principles of the university’s learning and teaching model.
Course Credits: 9.0

HUMN104: Social, Economic and Environmental Sustainability

Critically explores understandings of sustainability as a complex phenomenon that impacts and intersects with our lives in multiple ways. Focuses on personal responsibility as global citizens through the theoretical lens of the three dimensions of sustainability - sociopolitical, environmental, and economic, or “people, planet, profit.”
Course Credits: 3.0

WRIT110: Writing for Success

Focuses on building writing skills necessary in a variety of non-academic contexts. Considers the importance of written communication in career and business settings. Explores steps involved in production of a variety of authentic writing tasks, including composing business emails and letters, and summarizing text and video. Introduces the concept of reflective writing and encourages the expression of original ideas. Presents various techniques to help put ideas into words. Guides students in maintaining a journal of learning.
Course Credits: 3.0

WRIT111: Academic Writing

Teaches students to effectively and clearly present ideas and arguments in writing. Focuses on development of critical reasoning skills and on methods and strategies for writing in the social and applied sciences. Pre-requisites: IENV 101
Course Credits: 3.0

BESC201: Organizational Behavior

Examines the way in which individuals function effectively in organizations, examining behaviour from individual, team, and organizational perspectives within an intercultural context. The course will help students develop an understanding of the impact of cross cultural differences on organizational behaviour issues and prepare them to develop their own approach for working in diverse work environments.
Course Credits: 3.0

BUSA201: Introduction to Business Administration

Introduces business and management principles and concepts The course covers the nature of a variety of business types from multi-national corporations to the local non-profit group with a focus on developing, marketing and managing all aspects of the business.
Course Credits: 3.0

BUSA204: Principles of Economics

Introduces students to measurement of economic activity and the impact of monetary and fiscal policy on the level and type of economic activity. Prepares students to weigh political and economic issues as they relate to international business ventures
Course Credits: 3.0

BUSA205: Management Statistics

Develops students' knowledge of statistical concepts and techniques used in business decision making. This foundation is critical in enabling students to understand how to gather business information (data), organize and analyze these data, and apply tools and methods to analyze the data. Course participants will develop a critical appreciation of how to use data to inform situations and decisions in international business
Course Credits: 3.0

BUSA206: Fundamentals of Human Resources Management

Examines the concepts of human capital and explores the challenges and opportunities of recruiting, engaging, and retaining staff in the complex and changing landscape within which organizations operate.
Course Credits: 3.0

BUSA208: Marketing

Introduces the process by which products/services are planned, priced, promoted and distributed for the benefit of the consumer and society. Develops an understanding of marketing as a key component of a socially responsible and ethical organization strategy
Course Credits: 3.0

BUSA215: Financial Accounting I

Uses the conceptual framework of accounting to introduce basic accounting processes and principles and the preparation of financial statements. BUSA215 is the first part of a two-part course suite that demonstrates the methods of recording, summarizing, and analyzing an economic entity's financial transactions and explores the different ways of effectively communicating financial information to both internal users, such as management, and external users, such as investors and creditors. The key areas covered in BUSA215 are the purpose and use of financial statements, the accounting information system, accrual accounting, merchandising operations, and inventory valuation.
Course Credits: 3.0

BUSA216: Financial Accounting 2

Uses the conceptual framework of accounting to introduce basic accounting processes and principles and the preparation of financial statements. BUSA216 is the second part of a two-part course suite that demonstrates the methods of summarizing, and analyzing an economic entity's financial transactions and explores the different ways of effectively communicating financial information to both internal users, such as management, and external users, such as investors and creditors. The key areas covered in BUSA216 are internal control, managing receivables, long lived assets, and performance
Course Credits: 3.0

COMM211: Advanced Academic Communication

Teaches effective means of academic communication including essays, analytical assignments, visual materials and presentations, as well as ethical issues surrounding their production. The main focus of this course is the production of communication material with clear, critical thought and reasoned argument. It examines argument building, the linking and exposition of ideas, the production of individual elements of an argument down to the level of sentences, and the cultural, historical and institutional objectives of academic communication.
Course Credits: 3.0

IHMN201: The Business of Tourism

Explores the tourism industry examining the interrelationships between the tourism sectors. Evaluates the economic role of accommodations, food and beverage, recreation and entertainment, transportation and travel service components. Focuses on challenging and inspiring future tourism leaders through a process of integrating and applying knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to real world situations in ethical and meaningful ways. Delivery Method On-campus
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST203: Culture, Ethnicity and Identity

Considers cultural diversity as a human right according to the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. Explores the framework for cultural protection and its importance for human identity under the Declaration. Undertakes a critical assessment of the discourse on ethnicity and nation state and models for the successful reconciliation of both (such as Canadian multiculturalism and multi-nationalism). Includes discussion of post colonial state organizations and addresses indigenous governance models.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST205: The Environment and Justice

Builds on the assumption that social justice and environmental sustainability are intertwined, and that environmental problems are interconnected with social structure. Examines contrasting theoretical perspectives, practices, and examples of environmental justice advocacy and action.
Course Credits: 3.0

ITAI: Introduction to Academic Integrity

The Introduction to Academic Integrity course illustrates academic integrity and plagiarism in real-life scenarios. A clear sense of academic honesty and responsibility is fundamental to good scholarship, and the integrity of university academic work and the degrees conferred by the university is dependent upon the honesty and soundness of the teacher-student learning relationship and of the evaluation process. Therefore, all students must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism, and other academic offences. The Introduction to Academic Integrity course serves as a helpful, interactive companion to the academic integrity policy and procedures outlined in the Student Policies & Procedures, which contains the policies and procedures that guide academic life at Royal Roads and support our mission as a university.
Course Credits: 0.0

STNBB: Pathway to the BBA

The Pathway to the BBA is designed to guide incoming learners through various key resources that are available to undergraduate learners at RRU. It provides links to important and useful information, as well as leading you through readings and exercises for completion, to fully support successful orientation into the BBA program. Credit: 0.0 (Completion is required – Pass/Fail)
Course Credits: 0.0

ENMN332: Managerial Accounting

Develops the skills required to apply financial information to managerial and entrepreneurial decision making, with emphasis on tracking and managing financial performance. The course explores the value of financial planning in determining potential profit and loss, and considers the limitations of financial data. Pre-requisite: ENMN324, unless otherwise approved by the Program Head.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL300: Critical Thinking and Argument

Critical Thinking and Argument builds foundational skills in argumentation, communication, and problem solving. You will be guided in acquiring third-year business school skills in summarizing, analyzing, conducting secondary research, and engaging in case analysis. Prequisites: While not required, Introduction to Academic Writing and Critical Thinking offered by RRU is recommended.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL301A: Foundations of Sustainability and Business A

Introduces the concepts of sustainability by taking into account the interplay of financial, social and environmental impacts of international business. Draws on several disciplines to provide students with both a solid conceptual framework, and practical tools to manage organizations sustainably in an international setting. STNL 301A focuses on sustainability through the lens of the individual as a consumer. STNL301B focuses on sustainability through the lens of societal expectations of corporations and STNL301C focuses on sustainability through the lens of corporate social responsibility and attention to economic, social and environmental impacts of a company’s actions. Co-requisite: STNL300A
Course Credits: 1.5

STNL301B: Foundations of Sustainability and Business B

Introduces the concepts of sustainability by taking into account the interplay of financial, social and environmental impacts of international business. Draws on several disciplines to provide students with both a solid conceptual framework, and practical tools to manage organizations sustainably in an international setting. This course focuses on sustainability through the lens of societal expectations of corporations. STNL301A focuses on sustainability through the lens of the individual as a consumer. STNL301C focuses on sustainability through the lens of corporate social responsibility and attention to economic, social and environmental impacts of a company’s actions. Co-requisite: STNL300B
Course Credits: 1.5

STNL310: Business and Ecology

Provides an introduction to the dynamics of ecological systems and examines how these are affected by human economic activity. Introduces core concepts in ecology and explores how industrial processes and business practices interact with those systems to produce adverse ecological outcomes.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL311: Sustainability Marketing: A Global Perspective

Integrates social, ethical and environmental values into marketing strategy development and decision-making. Introduces students to a sustainability marketing mix that elevates marketing’s role beyond that of responding to social change to that of contributing to the transformation to a more sustainable society.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL312: Globalization in the Business World

Examines both the opportunities and threats generated through globalization. Explores the business sector’s response to issues such as global crises, environmental concerns, global competition, market trends and product development. Investigates business trends and issues, with particular attention to cultural, socio-economic, geopolitical and environmental contexts within a global context. Focuses on the developed and developing world as business management and operational issues are looked at in both. Pre-requisites: STNL300A, STNL301A. Co-requisites; STNL311, STNL313.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL320: Sustainability Accounting

Introduces students to systems and procedures that help ensure sustainability issues are considered in decision making and reporting. Discusses accounting tools to help assess and manage the social and environmental impact of business operations. Pre-requisites: BUSA 203 or equivalent; ENMN 332
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL322: The Social, Political and Legal Environment of Global Business

Explores the social, political and legal issues that combine to define the operating environment of global business today. Investigates the nature of international law and explores the roles and impacts of various political systems, trade agreements and business options. Considers the importance of understanding the diversity and interconnectedness of the global environment within which an organization operates.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL324: Business Ethics

Examines ethical issues in the international business environment as they pertain to multiple stakeholders including customers, employees, suppliers, partners and the local community. Explores the roles of individual managers, corporate governance systems and national/international social norms and legal systems in supporting ethical decision making and practice.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL331: Strategy for Business and Sustainability

Explores the foundational strategic perspectives required by business practitioners responsible for crafting and executing their organizations’ strategies. Students will explore and think critically about the core strategic notions, concepts, tools, models and theories required by managers to manage and lead their organizations in today’s challenging, turbulent business ecosystem. Concepts of sustainable value, social capital and value co-creation will extend strategic thinking to the firm's sustainability objectives.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL333: Human Resource Management for Innovation and Sustainability

Explores the strategic role of human resource management (HRM) in supporting innovation and sustainability, and how HRM practices and systems can be used to staff, remunerate, and train and develop human capital to support the organisation’s strategic objectives of innovation and sustainability. From a strategic perspective, investigates how managers can effectively encourage and develop employee attitudes and behaviours needed for successful innovation, such as employee engagement and commitment, and employee green behaviours.
Course Credits: 3.0

ENMN426: Finance

Explores the financial system and its relationship to financial markets using financial models for predicting funding requirements for various organizational structures. Examines the process of raising funds and determining the capital structure that is appropriate to the level of business risk. Pre-requisite: ENMN324 and ENMN 332, unless otherwise approved by the Program Head.
Course Credits: 3.0

ENSC423: Environmental Economics

Economics is usually described as the analysis of the rational development and use of scarce resources. Students learn the principles of efficient allocations of all resources regardless of how well markets ration this development and use. Examines the pervasiveness of market failures for environmental goods and the effectiveness of different techniques and policies attempting to correct these failures or to mitigate their negative consequences. Illustrating examples are chosen as much as possible from the experience of British Columbia and other regions of Canada.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL401: Community and Stakeholder Relations

Explores the importance of community and stakeholder engagement practices in the contemporary business environment. The role of communities and stakeholders as collaborators in business decision-making and as co-creators of product and service value is examined. Reviews specific models of identifying and engaging stakeholder groups, building trust, developing communication practices, and nurturing and maintaining relationship.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL411: Consumer Behaviour and Culture

Examines relevant theories and models of consumer behaviour and latest thinking in consumer research and how it informs marketing decision-making. This course seeks to help students to develop a broader multicultural view of consumption, beyond the act of buying. It seeks to develop students’ ability to understand how products, services and consumption activities contribute to, and shape our social experiences.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL412: Sustainable Operations and Supply Chain Management

The Sustainable Operations and Supply Chain Management course (STNL 412) develops knowledge on key concepts and techniques of operations and supply chain management. Explores how different elements of sustainability can be managed in the context of international operations and supply chains. Critically analyzes and discusses real-life situations from an operational perspective.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL420: Business Field School

Further develops skills learned during Foundational Courses and integrates these skills with learning from other course areas in an active business environment. Students will be immersed in an experiential field-based course which will provide an opportunity to take the classroom into the real world. Site visits will be combined with coursework and assignments, and insights gained during this experience will form the basis for a Capstone Project which will be completed as part of the course. Pre-requisite: successful completion of a minimum of 45 upper-level (numbered 300 and above) credits in the BBA Program.
Course Credits: 6.0

STNL422: Leading Organizations

Explores differences in approaches to leadership within businesses in different cultures, including how diversity in the workplace and differences in cultural values require adaptive leadership. Prepares students for taking responsibility, not only for leading others, but also for leading themselves through ambiguity, complexity and unfamiliar inter-cultural situations relating to business.
Course Credits: 3.0

STNL425: Global Social Entrepreneurship

This course dives into underlying theories to explain how social entrepreneurs work to create positive social change around the world. The course weaves together themes of grand challenges and entrepreneurial mindsets, coupled with the tools of design thinking, integrative thinking, and systems thinking. Whereas most social entrepreneurship courses recognize social venture start-ups and/or technical solutions, this course focuses on students understanding a pressing social or environmental issue by mapping the landscape of the current solutions and to identify missing opportunities for positive change.
Course Credits: 3.0